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HTTP and its Interactions

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Contents

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Course Introduction
1
What is The Cloud?
PREVIEW5m 4s
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HTTP and its Interactions
Overview
DifficultyBeginner
Duration34m
Students3836
Ratings
4.7/5
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Description

Want a simple explanation to some of the technical terms and concepts everyone else seems to know already? This course is here to help!

 

Transcript

The client server model may be at the heart of how users interact with the internet, but hypertext transfer protocol or HTTP is at the heart of the client server model. So what is it and how does it work? HTTP is a lightweight application level protocol which builds hypermedia or web systems. It's been used since 1990, and is currently on version 1.1. If you're interested in learning more about it, check out this site. HTTP is based on Transmission Control Protocol, or TCP, which is the connection base part of the TCP IP stack. This might sound a little like jargon right now. But all you really need to know is that it's great for HTTP because it means that like TCP, HTTP can handle large amounts of data reliably. Another unique feature of HTTP is that it's stateless. This means that each HTTP request stands alone, and no information is retained about the request in the browser, or on the server. While this is fine for simple document requests, does create problems for applications which need to track a user's identity. When you're trying to access a website, you enter the URL into your browser and hit Enter. And within a few moments, the website loads and it's as easy as that. But what actually happens between your clients and the server during this process? The client connects to the server and sends a request with a method, a Uniform Resource Identifier or URI and the HTTP protocol version. This might look something like this. The client will also send a mind type header and a message. The server will respond to your client with a status line, including the protocol version and an internet standard error code. Last up, the server sends a mime like message with the requested resource in it. This might look something like this. And that's it for this video. HTTP is incredibly flexible and powerful, and it facilitates the communication between all of our clients and servers.

Lectures

About the Author
Students84526
Courses95
Learning paths52

Head of Content

Andrew is an AWS certified professional who is passionate about helping others learn how to use and gain benefit from AWS technologies. Andrew has worked for AWS and for AWS technology partners Ooyala and Adobe.  His favorite Amazon leadership principle is "Customer Obsession" as everything AWS starts with the customer. Passions around work are cycling and surfing, and having a laugh about the lessons learnt trying to launch two daughters and a few start ups. 

Covered Topics