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Amazon ECS

Contents

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Introduction
1
Overview
PREVIEW1m 23s
2
Terminology
PREVIEW12m 34s
Services at a Glance
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Overview
DifficultyBeginner
Duration3h 8m
Students9501
Ratings
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Description

The ‘Foundations for Solutions Architect–Associate on AWS’ course is designed to walk you through the AWS compute, storage, and service offerings you need to be familiar with for the AWS Solutions Architect–Associate exam. This course provides you with snapshots of each service, and covering just what you need to know, gives you a good, high-level starting point for exam preparation. It includes coverage of:

Compute
Amazon Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2)
Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS)
AWS Lambda
Amazon Lightsail
Amazon Batch

Storage and Database
Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3)
Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS)
Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS)
Amazon Glacier
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon Elasticache
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Elastic MapReduce (EMR)

Services
Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS)
Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS)
Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF)
Amazon Simple Email Service (SES)
Amazon CloudSearch
Amazon API Gateway
Amazon AppStream
Amazon WorkSpaces
Amazon Data Pipeline
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon OpsWorks
Amazon CloudFormation

Course Objectives

  • Review AWS services relevant to the Solutions Architect–Associate exam
  • Illustrate how each service can be used in an AWS based solution

Intended Audience

This course is for anyone preparing for the Solutions Architect–Associate for AWS certification exam. We assume you have some existing knowledge and familiarity with AWS, and are specifically looking to get ready to take the certification exam.

Pre-Requisites

If you are new to cloud computing I recommend you do our introduction to cloud computing courses first. These courses will give you a basic introduction to the Cloud and with Amazon Web Services. We have two courses that I recommend - What is Cloud Computing?  and  technical Fundamentals for AWS

The What is Cloud Computing? lecture is part of the Introduction to Cloud Computing learning path. I recommend doing this learning path if you want a good basic understanding of why you might consider using AWS Cloud Services. If you feel comfortable with Cloud, but would like to learn more about Amazon Web Services, then recommend completing the technical Fundamentals for AWS course to build your knowledge about Amazon Web Services and the value the services bring to customers. 

If you have any questions or concerns about where to start please email us at support@cloudacademy.com so we can help you with your personal learning path. 

Ok so on to our certification learning path! 

Solution Architect Associate for AWS Learning Path 

This Course Includes:

  • 7 video lectures
  • Snapshots of 24 key AWS services

What You'll Learn

Lecture Group What you'll learn
Compute Fundamentals Amazon Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2)
Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS)
AWS Lambda
Storage Fundamentals

Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3)
Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS)
Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS)
Amazon Glacier
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon Elasticache
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Elastic MapReduce (EMR)

Services at a Glance

Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS)
Amazon Simple Notification Service (SNS)
Amazon Simple Workflow Service (SWF)
Amazon Simple Email Service (SES)
Amazon CloudSearch
Amazon API Gateway
Amazon AppStream
Amazon WorkSpaces
Amazon Data Pipeline
Amazon Cognito
Amazon Kinesis
Amazon OpsWorks
Amazon CloudFormation

 

If you have thoughts or suggestions for this course, please contact Cloud Academy at support@cloudacademy.com.

Transcript

Hello and welcome to this short lecture which will provide a high level overview of the Amazon EC2 Container Service. Commonly known as Amazon ECS.

This service allows you to run Docker enabled applications packaged as containers across a cluster of EC2 instances. Without requiring you to manage a complex and administratively heavy cluster management system. The burden of managing your own cluster management system is abstracted with the Amazon ECS Service, by passing that responsibility over to the service itself.

If you are new to some of these terms such as Docker and Containers, then let me, quickly in a single sentence define what they are to help you understand the service a little easier.

Docker is a piece of software that allows you to automate the installation and distribution of applications inside Linux Containers.

So what are Containers? A Container holds everything that an application requires to enable it to run from within its isolated Container package. This may include system libraries, code, system tools, run time, etc. But it does not include an operating system like a virtual machine does. And so reduces the overhead of the actual container itself.

Containers are decoupled from the underlying OS, making Container applications very portable, lightweight, flexible, and scalable across a Cloud environment. This ensures that the application will always run as expected, regardless of its deployment location.

With this in mind, if you are already using Docker or have existing Containerized applications packaged locally, then these will work seamlessly on Amazon ECS.

But let's take a deeper look at the EC2 Container Service. And some of the additional functions that it provides. As I mentioned before, EC2 Container Services removes the need for you to manage your own cluster management system. This is usually very time consuming and requires a lot of overhead to continually monitor it, maintain it, and scale. With Amazon ECS there is no need to install any management software for your cluster. Neither is there a need to install any monitoring software either. All of this and more is taken care of by the service. Allowing you to focus on building great applications and deploying them across your scalable cluster.

Monitoring is taken care of through the use of AWS CloudWatch, which will monitor metrics against your containers and your clusters. Those of you who have used CloudWatch before will be aware that you can easily create alarms based off of these metrics, providing you notification of when specific events occur, such as your cluster size scanning up or down.

An Amazon ECS Cluster is comprised of a collection of EC2 instances. As such, some of the functionality and features that we have already discussed in this course, can be used with these instances. For example, security groups to implement instance level security at the port and protocol level, along with ELB and auto scaling, which we looked into in the previous lecture. Although these EC2 instances form a cluster, they still operate in much the same way as a single EC2 instance.

So, for example, should you need to connect to one of the instances themselves, you could still use the same familiar methods, such as initiating and SSH connection. The clusters themselves act as a resource pool, aggregating resources such as CPU and memory.

The cluster is dynamically scalable. Meaning you can start your cluster as a single, small instance. But it can dynamically scale to thousands of large instances. Multiple instance types can be used within the cluster if required.

Although the cluster is dynamically scalable, it's important to point out that it can only scale within a single region.

Amazon ECS is region specific. So it can span multiple availability zones but it cannot span multiple regions. With ECS you can schedule your Containers to be deployed across your cluster based on different requirements, such as resource requirements or specific availability requirements, through the use of multiple availability zones. The instances within the Amazon ECS Cluster also have a Docker daemon and an ECS Agent installed. These agents communicate with each other, allowing Amazon ECS commands to be translated into Docker commands.

That brings us to the end of this lecture on the Amazon EC2 Container Service.

Additionally, if you would like additional information on Docker, please see our existing course, Introduction to Docker.

Coming up in the next lecture, we will focus on another compute service, AWS Elastic Beanstalk.

About the Author

Students63542
Courses91
Learning paths40

Andrew is an AWS certified professional who is passionate about helping others learn how to use and gain benefit from AWS technologies. Andrew has worked for AWS and for AWS technology partners Ooyala and Adobe.  His favorite Amazon leadership principle is "Customer Obsession" as everything AWS starts with the customer. Passions around work are cycling and surfing, and having a laugh about the lessons learnt trying to launch two daughters and a few start ups.