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Installing the LAMP stack

Contents

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Move your LAMP stack on AWS
1
Installing the LAMP stack8m 33s
2
Securing your user accounts8m 36s
3
Choosing the right EC2 instance type8m 16s
4
Configuring a Security Group6m 47s
5
Extending the functionality of PHP6m 8s
6
Installing MySQL on Amazon RDS10m 23s
7
Summary2m 7s
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Overview
Transcript
DifficultyBeginner
Duration51m
Students1329

Description

The combination of Linux, Apache, MySQL, and Python or PHP (LAMP) is one of the most common software stacks for web servers, even for high-end web applications. In this course, the experienced sysadmin David Clinton will teach you how to install and configure a LAMP stack on AWS EC2 and RDS, also discussing security issues and selecting the right instance type for your application.

This course will cover all the steps in the process: from creating an instance to building a website-hosting LAMP stack. You'll find everything you need to configure your webserver using EC2 (Elastic Cloud Compute) and RDS (Amazon Relational Database) to power your MySQL instance.

Who should take this course

This is a beginner course that aims to introduce basic AWS concepts to anyone looking for a quick guide to building a web server in the AWS cloud. We'll take you through all the basic steps, from configuring your Linux installation to using Amazon RDS to take advantage of AWS scalability.

You should have some basic Linux knowledge. If you are new to Amazon Web Services, why not watch our AWS Basics course or some of the other introductory courses to the common AWS services, like Amazon RDS

And feel free to test your knowledge on the basic topics covered in this course by taking a quiz.

If you have thoughts or suggestions for this course, please contact Cloud Academy at support@cloudacademy.com.

About the Author

Students15821
Courses17
Learning paths2

David taught high school for twenty years, worked as a Linux system administrator for five years, and has been writing since he could hold a crayon between his fingers. His childhood bedroom wall has since been repainted.

Having worked directly with all kinds of technology, David derives great pleasure from completing projects that draw on as many tools from his toolkit as possible.

Besides being a Linux system administrator with a strong focus on virtualization and security tools, David writes technical documentation and user guides, and creates technology training videos.

His favorite technology tool is the one that should be just about ready for release tomorrow. Or Thursday.