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Overview of Differences Between AWS Database Types

Contents

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The course is part of these learning paths

Working with AWS Databases
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11
certification
3
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5
AWS Cloud Practitioner Certification Preparation
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13
certification
2
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5
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Course Introduction
Overview
DifficultyBeginner
Duration1h 1m
Students373
Ratings
4.8/5
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Description

This course provides a high-level overview of the managed database offerings available from AWS.

It covers relational and non-relational databases, how they work, their strengths, and what workloads are best suited for them.

It includes an overview and the characteristics of non-relational databases as well as what NoSQL means and why it’s important to application development.

If you have any feedback relating to this course, feel free to contact us at support@cloudacademy.com.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain a general understanding of databases within AWS
  • Learn about non-relational databases and how they can be used
  • Understand the characteristics of NoSQL databases and how they can be used for application development
  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of the different types of managed NoSQL databases on AWS

Intended Audience

This course is intended for people that are relatively new to relational and non-relational databases and want to gain an understanding of what types of databases are available on AWS.

Prerequisites

To get the most out of this course, you should ideally have a very basic knowledge of relational and non-relational databases and previous experience with AWS.

Transcript

Hello and welcome to this course on the different types of fully-managed databases available from Amazon Web Services.  

My name is Stephen Cole and I’ll be your instructor for this course.  I’ve been working in the cloud for several years and currently hold 6 active AWS certifications including the AWS Certified Database - Specialty cert.

My contact information is shown on the screen.  Please feel free to reach out to me with any questions, comments, or concerns.  

Alternatively, you can always get in touch with us here at Cloud Academy by sending an email to support@cloudacademy.com and one of our cloud experts will follow up with you.

This course is intended for people that are relatively new to relational and non-relational databases and want to gain an understanding of what types of databases are available on AWS.

This course covers databases at a very high level and will include how they work, their strengths, and what workloads are best suited for them. 

This course will explain, in general terms, what a relational database is, what type of data it holds, and what sort of application workloads are appropriate for it.

It will outline what non-relational databases are and give an overview of their characteristics.

It will describe, in general terms, what NoSQL means and why it’s important to application development.

It will list and describe the types of fully-managed databases available from AWS and provide the related AWS service supporting that database.

For each type of database, it will include a general description of how the database works, what sort of workload is appropriate, and general use cases.

I am a proponent of describing things as they are instead of saying what they’re not.  However, sometimes I have to list what will be excluded from the content.

This course will *not* cover specific database services.

This course will *not* have any deep dives into database technology.

This course will *not* include any demos.

While it’s possible to host nearly any database type on an EC2 instance, AWS has many fully-managed relational and non-relational databases available.  AWS currently has 15 purpose-built database engines including relational, key-value, document, in-memory, columnar, graph, time series, and ledger databases. 

AWS’s portfolio of purpose-built databases supports diverse data models and allows developers to create highly scalable, distributed applications. 

By knowing how to choose an appropriate database--or set of databases--to address business needs, organizations can start to fully realize the benefits of the cloud and create agile, cost-effective solutions.

Please note that, at the time this content was written, the course information was accurate.  AWS implements hundreds of updates every month as part of its ongoing drive to innovate and enhance its services.

As a result, minor discrepancies may appear in the course content over time.  Here at Cloud Academy, we strive to keep our courses up to date in order to provide the best training available.  

If you notice any information that is outdated, please contact support@cloudacademy.com.  

This will allow us to update the course during the next release cycle.  We would love to hear from you.  I would love to hear from you.  Tell me what you learned, what could use some attention, or what worked really well for you.

Lectures

The AWS Database Landscape - Relational Databases - NoSQL Databases - Types of Managed NoSQL on AWS - Part 1 - Types of Managed NoSQL on AWS - Part 2 - Summary and Conclusion

About the Author
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Courses3
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Stephen is the AWS Certification Specialist at Cloud Academy. His content focuses heavily on topics related to certification on Amazon Web Services technologies. He loves teaching and believes that there are no shortcuts to certification but it is possible to find the right path and course of study.

Stephen has worked in IT for over 25 years in roles ranging from tech support to systems engineering. At one point, he taught computer network technology at a community college in Washington state.

Before coming to Cloud Academy, Stephen worked as a trainer and curriculum developer at AWS and brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in cloud technologies.

In his spare time, Stephen enjoys reading, sudoku, gaming, and modern square dancing.