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Daily scrum best practice

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Contents

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Facilitating Purposeful Agile Meetings
1
Scrum Roles
PREVIEW6m 1s
2
Scrum Events
PREVIEW6m 25s

The course is part of this learning path

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DifficultyBeginner
Duration19m
Students171
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Description

Course Description

This module looks at the different scrum events and scrum roles, before focusing on best practice for the daily scrum.

Learning Objectives 

The objectives of this course are to provide you with and understanding of: 

  • What the scrum events are 
  • What the roles in scrum are 
  • How to run a daily scrum 
  • Best practice for the daily scrum  

Intended Audience 

This course is aimed at Scrum Masters who want to improve their individual knowledge of facilitating scrum events in service to their Scrum team and their wider organization 

Prerequisites

There are no specific pre-requisites to study this course 

Feedback 

We welcome all feedback and suggestions - please contact us at qa.elearningadmin@qa.com to let us know what you think.

Transcript

Using the Daily Scrum is a great way to help the development team inspect and adapt their progress toward the sprint goal. But it's also easy for the development team to fall into some bad habits. As a Scrum Master, it's your responsibility to help the team avoid this. In this video, we're going to dive into some advice to help you promote best practice with your development team.  

Firstly, don't let anyone ramble on. This general rule of thumb is also why the Daily Scrum is sometimes referred to as the Daily Standup. Of course, this solution only works if everyone is present, and is less helpful if some of the team work remotely. Still, when possible, keeping everyone standing is a great way to encourage everyone to be brief.  

Second, always be sure to have a set agenda for the Daily Scrum. This can be done using the standard three question format of what did I do yesterday? What will I do today? What are my blockers? But really, it can be anything. The important thing is consistency here. Everyone needs to know what they will be talking about, and get into that rhythm. Whatever format you use, it's really important that any issue, no matter how small is called out. Getting on top of an issue when it's small is obviously preferable than doing so once it becomes large.  

Next up, you need to make sure that your sprint backlog is visible. Whether this is a physical or digital kanban board or something like juror sprint view, the team needs to be able to see a visual representation of their progress toward the sprint goal. Project management tools like JIRA also tend to come with automatically generated reports like burn down charts. These are a great way to see the status of the sprint because they show the number of story points completed versus the amount of time left in the sprint.  

It's easy for people to start treating it as a quick one-to-one meeting where they tell you what they're doing, but actually, this misses the point of the Daily Scrum. The whole point of having everyone come together is that they can help solve problems together, and to make sure that they don't become blockers to each other. Use the Daily Scrum as a chance to collaborate everyday 

Lastly, make sure to do the Daily Scrum at the same time everyday. Get the buy-in of everyone in the team to make sure that the Daily Scrum always happens when everyone is available. Whether this is first thing in the morning, mid-morning or in the afternoon, it should always happen when it makes sense for the whole team, and it should always happen at the same time. This provides a strong routine for everyone, which in turn, promotes productivity.  

So those are the best five practices to help you and your development team make the most out of your Daily Scrum. But there are also four bad habits we want to call out that you really want to avoid. Never wait around for the team to start the Daily Scrum. It should always happen at the same time and if you wait around, team members might start to think that they can be late, which, of course, you want to avoid. Don't allow anyone of the team to introduce new ideas during the Daily Scrum. The Daily Scrum must always have the set agenda, and letting new ideas come in will totally derail the short time box that you have for this event.  

Don't let people ramble. As a Scrum Master, you need to make sure that everyone in the development team only talks about things, which are also valuable to everyone else in the team. Last up, the Daily Scrum does not replace the need to communicate in the team. It should stimulate further communication and collaboration, not replace it. That's all for this video. The Daily Scrum is an incredibly important event, and as a Scrum Master, you need to promote best practice and make sure that the development team doesn't develop bad habits. 

About the Author
Students3365
Courses36
Learning paths9

Tony has over 20 years’ experience in Business Development, Business Change, Consulting and Project/Programme Management working with public, private and third sector organisations.

He has helped organisations to design and create process and procedures to align ways of working with corporate strategy. A highly motivated and detailed solution provider utilising a wide range of methods and frameworks to provide structure whilst promoting creativity and innovation.

As a confident and self-motivated professional with excellent communication skills Tony is able to bring people together and get them working as a team quickly.

Tony is an Agile and Scrum trainer with a vast knowledge spanning IT Systems, Business Change, Programme and Project Management. With excellent presentation skills and a solid background, he ensures that all clients gain maximum benefit from his training. He has successfully guided those new to the industry through their initial training, helped experienced staff as they progress in their careers and worked at Director level advising on best use and practice, as well as tailoring courses to fulfil the exact needs of clients.