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Registering the Client Application

Contents

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Introduction
1
Introduction
PREVIEW1m 37s
2
Getting Started
PREVIEW1m 19s
3
Overview
2m 25s
Configuring the Service
API Policies
14
Summary
16

The course is part of this learning path

AZ-203 Exam Preparation: Developing Solutions for Microsoft Azure
course-steps 20 certification 1 lab-steps 7
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Overview
DifficultyAdvanced
Duration54m
Students186
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Description

This course deals with how to deploy, configure, and manage some keys aspects of Azure API management (APIM). In particular, we focus on the authentication mechanism and go into depth about how to set up OAuth 2.0, including creating the Azure AD required application registrations. To help with understanding and troubleshooting the OAuth flow, we utilize Postman to check and validate our configuration. Next, we take a look at how we can alter API requests at various scopes using API policies. Finally, we look at how to view effective API policies that span multiple scopes and also how to trace API policies during runtime.

Learning Objectives

  • Deploy Azure API Management and import an existing API
  • Gain an understanding of how the configure authentication against APIM using OAuth 2.0
  • Implement API policies against the imported API to alter the API request
  • Use Postman to make API requests against APIM and request and use OAuth authorization tokens
  • Secure the imported API by requiring a valid Azure AD token

Intended Audience

  • People who want to become Azure developers and who design and build cloud solutions
  • People preparing for Microsoft’s AZ-203 exam

Prerequisites

  • General knowledge of Azure

Transcript

Before a client application can present a token to an authorization server to gain access to privileged information on behalf of a user that application must be registered with an authentication server. To do this the application owner must provide a name, a callback or reply URL to represent the application. We can use this information in Azure AD to create a registered application. When we create the application we get a Client ID which is a public and unique identifier and we create a Client Secret. We give this Client ID and Client Secret back to the client application. With this combination, Azure AD knows who is sending the request and has a list of valid reply URLs stored for that application and will direct the OAuth request to the requested URL as long as it is valid. We saw this earlier with Postman when we tried to get an access token, the request failed because Postman's callback URL was not on the list of valid reply URLs stored with the Azure AD application.

About the Author

Students1590
Courses2

Matthew Quickenden is a motivated Infrastructure Consultant with over 20 years of industry experience supporting Microsoft systems and other Microsoft products and solutions. He works as a technical delivery lead managing resources, understanding and translating customer requirements and expectations into architecture, and building technical solutions. In recent years, Matthew has been focused on helping businesses consume and utilize cloud technologies with a focus on leveraging automation to rapidly deploy and manage cloud resources at scale.