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Introduction

The course is part of these learning paths

AZ-900 Exam Preparation: Microsoft Azure Fundamentals
course-steps 9 certification 1 lab-steps 3
Architecting Microsoft Azure Solutions
course-steps 10 certification 6 lab-steps 5
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Introduction
Overview
DifficultyIntermediate
Duration51m
Students2188
Ratings
4.7/5
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Description

Microsoft Azure offers services for a wide variety of compute-related needs, including traditional compute resources like virtual machines, as well as serverless and container-based services. In this course, you will learn how to design a compute infrastructure using the appropriate Azure services.

Some of the highlights include:

  • Designing highly available implementations using fault domains, update domains, availability sets, scale sets, availability zones, and multi-region deployments
  • Ensuring business continuity and disaster recovery using Azure Backup, System Center DPM, and Azure Recovery Services
  • Creating event-driven functions in a serverless environment using Azure Functions and Azure Log Apps
  • Designing microservices-based applications using Azure Container Service, which supports Kubernetes, and Azure Service Fabric, which is Microsoft’s proprietary container orchestrator
  • Deploying high-performance web applications with autoscaling using Azure App Service
  • Managing and securing APIs using Azure API Management and Azure Active Directory
  • Running compute-intensive jobs on clusters of servers using Azure Batch and Azure Batch AI

Learning Objectives

  • Design Azure solutions using virtual machines, serverless computing, and microservices
  • Design web solutions using Azure App Service
  • Run compute-intensive applications using Azure Batch

Intended Audience

  • People who want to become Azure cloud architects
  • People preparing for Microsoft’s 70-535 exam (Architecting Microsoft Azure Solutions)

Prerequisites

  • General knowledge of IT architecture

Transcript

Welcome to “Designing an Azure Compute Infrastructure”. My name’s Guy Hummel and I’ll be helping you with the compute aspects of architecting an Azure solution. I’m the Azure Content Lead at Cloud Academy and I have over 10 years of experience with cloud technologies. If you have any questions, feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn and send me a message, or send an email to support@cloudacademy.com.

This course is intended for people who want to become Azure cloud architects.

To get the most from this course, you should have a general knowledge of IT architecture.

We’ll start with how to design solutions using virtual machines. Then I’ll go over Azure Backup and Azure Site Recovery, two essential services for business continuity and disaster recovery. Next, we’ll get into serverless computing, especially Azure Functions. After that, I’ll explain how to design microservices-based solutions. Then we’ll cover how to design web solutions using Azure App Service and other supporting services. Finally, I’ll show you how to run compute-intensive applications, especially with Azure Batch.

By the end of this course, you should be able to design Azure solutions using virtual machines, serverless computing, and microservices; design web solutions using Azure App Service; and run compute-intensive applications using Azure Batch.

We’d love to get your feedback on this course, so please give it a rating when you’re finished.

Now, if you’re ready to learn how to get the most out of Azure’s compute services, then let’s get started.

About the Author

Students22386
Courses43
Learning paths29

Guy launched his first training website in 1995 and he's been helping people learn IT technologies ever since. He has been a sysadmin, instructor, sales engineer, IT manager, and entrepreneur. In his most recent venture, he founded and led a cloud-based training infrastructure company that provided virtual labs for some of the largest software vendors in the world. Guy’s passion is making complex technology easy to understand. His activities outside of work have included riding an elephant and skydiving (although not at the same time).