General Linux Security

Contents

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General Security
1
Introduction
PREVIEW1m 9s
2
Is Linux Secure?
PREVIEW2m 26s
5
Summary
1m 36s

The course is part of this learning path

Linux Security and Hardening
course-steps
7
certification
1
Introduction
Overview
Difficulty
Intermediate
Duration
21m
Students
60
Ratings
5/5
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Description

In this section of the course, you'll learn why Linux is considered to be a relatively secure operating system. You'll learn the fundamentals of Linux security and how to keep your systems safe.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand what superusers are in Linux
  • Learn why Linux systems are often avoided by attackers
  • Understand the security implications for open-source software such as Linux
  • Learn how various Linux components contribute to security including roles, network services, encryption, accounts, and multifactor authentication
  • Look at security principles that you can apply to your Linux systems

Intended Audience

This course is intended for anyone who wants an introduction to how to secure their Linux systems.

Prerequisites

To get the most out of this course, you should already have a good working knowledge of Linux. If you want to brush up on your Linux skills, consider taking our Learn Linux in 5 Days learning path first.

Transcript

In this section of the course, you'll learn why Linux is considered to be a relatively secure operating system. We'll talk about a special account on Linux systems called the superuser and how it differs from other accounts on a Linux system. You'll learn why Linux systems are often avoided by attackers and why this is both a good and bad thing. Next, we'll look at the security implications of using open source software such as Linux. From there, you'll learn how Linux systems manage software and security benefits that result from that design. We'll also look at the roles users and system administrators play in security. Next, we'll look at several security principles that you can use to guide you in making security-conscious decisions going forward. You'll also learn how to look at software and network services through the lens of security. We'll also touch on encryption, how to handle accounts and multi-factor authentication. Finally, we'll wrap up things with a discussion on the principle of least privilege, what that means and how you can apply it to your Linux systems.

About the Author
Avatar
Jason Cannon
Founder, Linux Training Academy
Students
719
Courses
60
Learning Paths
6

Jason is the founder of the Linux Training Academy as well as the author of "Linux for Beginners" and "Command Line Kung Fu." He has over 20 years of professional Linux experience, having worked for industry leaders such as Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, UPS, FireEye, and Amazon.com. Nothing gives him more satisfaction than knowing he has helped thousands of IT professionals level up their careers through his many books and courses.