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Overview of Amazon Cognito

Overview of Amazon Cognito
Overview
Difficulty
Beginner
Duration
2h 33m
Students
236
Ratings
4.5/5
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Description

This course provides detail on the AWS Security, Identity, and compliance services relevant to the AWS Developer - Associate exam. These services are used to help secure and protect your resources and environment through access control mechanisms and encryption.

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Learning Objectives

  • Learn what Identity Federation is
  • Learn about the AWS services that can be used with it
  • Understand how it's implemented
  • Understand the benefits of AWS SSO and how it can be used to simplify user access at scale
  • Create your own authentication mechanisms using Amazon Cognito
  • Create your own customized UI for user sign in
  • Create a secure user directory for all your applications and users
  • Understand what is meant identity and access management and the difference between authentication, authorization, and access control
  • Learn the components of IAM as well as its reporting features
  • Understand the core principles of cross-account access using IAM
  • How to implement and configure cross-account access
  • Define how the Key encryption process works
  • Explain the differences between the different key types 
  • Create and modify Key policies
  • Understand how to rotate, delete and reinstate keys
  • Define how to import your own Key material

 

Transcript

Amazon Cognito, one of the most annoying parts of building and creating applications, either mobile or web, is dealing with user authentication. Being able to determine who is and who is not allowed to operate specific services or aspects in application is extremely important. However, it can be a tedious and time consuming operation to set up.

In the past, all of that important user information would have been stored in a garden variety user database. This database might've been hosted onsite or even in the cloud. Either way, it was probably a relational database holding tables of usernames with associated permissions.

When working in AWS land, this means the database would either be hosted on RDS, the Relational Database Service, or by running your own database on EC2 instances. The trouble with using either of these methods is it requires a lot of work to get everything set up and maintain the system. We also have the familiar scenario of people working in the corporate environment.

All of their information is already stored in a directory service like Microsoft Active Directory and we don't want them to have to create yet another login and password for our new custom application. We would prefer that they could sign in with their day-to-day corporate username and password. Well, all these pain points can be resolved by using Amazon Cognito, a fairly small service that can do quite a lot of heavy lifting.

About the Author
Students
209984
Labs
1
Courses
205
Learning Paths
146

Stuart has been working within the IT industry for two decades covering a huge range of topic areas and technologies, from data center and network infrastructure design, to cloud architecture and implementation.

To date, Stuart has created 150+ courses relating to Cloud reaching over 180,000 students, mostly within the AWS category and with a heavy focus on security and compliance.

Stuart is a member of the AWS Community Builders Program for his contributions towards AWS.

He is AWS certified and accredited in addition to being a published author covering topics across the AWS landscape.

In January 2016 Stuart was awarded ‘Expert of the Year Award 2015’ from Experts Exchange for his knowledge share within cloud services to the community.

Stuart enjoys writing about cloud technologies and you will find many of his articles within our blog pages.