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Web Service Broker

Contents

keyboard_tab
Design Patterns
1
Design Patterns
PREVIEW2m 26s
2
Singleton Pattern
PREVIEW3m 13s
9
Decorator
7m 48s
10
Flyweight
9m 20s
11
Proxy
7m 36s
12
Facade
6m 5s
14
Command
11m 44s
15
Iterator
8m 24s
16
Visitor
9m 4s
17
Mediator
11m 38s
18
Memento
9m 48s
19
Observer
10m 40s
20
Strategy
8m 27s
21
State
10m 27s
22
Template
7m 56s
23
MVC
10m 27s
26
DAO
10m 27s
27

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Overview
Difficulty
Intermediate
Duration
4h 56m
Students
22
Ratings
5/5
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Description

This course takes an in-depth look at how to use design patterns in your Java projects. We will then run through some example questions of what you could expect from the Oracle Certified Java EE exam.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand what design patterns are
  • Learn about the myriad of design patterns that you can use in your projects

Intended Audience

This course is intended for anyone who already has basic knowledge of Java and now wants to learn about Java EE 6.

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge of Java programming.

 

Transcript

Hello dear Friends. In this video, we will examine the web service broker pattern. Let's begin. The Web service broker uses web protocols and XML. We can use this pattern to expose and broker the services. Assume a circumstance where multiple organizations are lined up in order to request info from a number of service providers. A broker provides the central medium which makes the transfer of information happen. It's a general gateway or an address in order for the client apps to be able to access a large, diverse variety of services. These services might need a broker in order to make an interaction with either only a single server app or multiple server apps. The broker performs certain tasks. It's responsible for receiving SOAP requests from the client apps in XML format along with authenticating the request and checking for the authorization. You can also use it to generate calls to multiple server apps which depends on the nature of the request. As you can see in this UML, this pattern also has some participants.

The client can be anything that is capable of making a Web service request. The endpoint processor is a servlet, it's the initial point of entry into the web service and is responsible for accepting and processing a request. The request is typically based on an HTTP request such as a SOAP request. Typically, the endpoint process is built into the runtime system such as when using JAX or PC. You can also build a custom endpoint processor. The web service broker is a web service that serves as a broker to one or more services. Those services can J2EE services such as Session facade and application services or Legacy EIS systems. The Web service broker can be realized in three ways. The business service can be a J2EE session facade in application service or a POJO facade to EIS. In fact, you will not come across this pattern very often. There will be no questions about this pattern in any exam. So, I believe that concludes this pattern. We'll continue with business tear patterns. In the following video, we will look at the service locator pattern. See you in the following video.

 

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OAK Academy is made up of tech experts who have been in the sector for years and years and are deeply rooted in the tech world. They specialize in critical areas like cybersecurity, coding, IT, game development, app monetization, and mobile development.

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