CloudAcademy

Getting Started with Jenkins on Windows (AWS)

Lab Steps

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Logging in to the Amazon Web Services Console
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Connecting to the Windows Instance
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Installing Prerequisite Software and Jenkins
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Exploring and Configuring Jenkins
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Creating a Jenkins User
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Installing Jenkins Plugins
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Creating Jenkins Projects
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Running and Modifying Jenkins Projects
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Deleting Your Jenkins Server

Ready for the real environment experience?

DifficultyIntermediate
Duration1h 19m
Students104

Description

Leverage the Power of Automation with Jenkins on Windows Server 

Lab Overview

Jenkins is a self-contained open source automation server you and your team can use to automate a variety of different tasks. Jenkins is a cornerstone of many continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) process flows. Jenkins allows you to automate software builds, tests, and deployments and features a powerful array of plugins to expand the system's capabilities. In this lab you will learn how to install and configure a stand-alone Jenkins web server on Windows Server 2016. You will also add some plugins and create your first example jobs. 

Lab Objectives

Upon completion of this lab you will be able to:

  • Connect to an EC2 instance on Amazon Web Services (AWS)
  • Install and configure a Jenkins server
  • Add plugins and create Jenkins jobs
  • Run Jenkins jobs and examine outputs and results

Lab Prerequisites

You should be familiar with:

  • Basic understanding of local operating system and computer use
  • Remote Desktop (RDP) connection methods
  • Software installation and configuration

Lab Environment

After completing the lab instructions the environment should look similar to:

Updates

December 3rd, 2018 - Updated Windows Server 2016 AMI to avoid issues with Lab startup

About the Author

Eric is a Lab Researcher and Developer working to add to Cloud Academy's library of hands-on labs. He is an IT veteran who enjoys the ever-changing landscape of cloud computing. He also relishes live classical music performances, because sometimes engineering is better heard than seen.