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The course is part of these learning paths

Get Started Building Cloud Solutions
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Introduction to the TOP Public Cloud Platforms
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Overview
DifficultyBeginner
Duration30m
Students1907
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Description

Now you should have a pretty good idea of the various services AWS offers for typical web application use cases. However, before we sign off I wanted to go over a few of the more niche services that AWS offers. There are many of these, and I’ll only touch on a few, but it just goes to show how much AWS has to offer no matter what your use case.

Transcript

Well, we've gone over a vast array of services provided by AWS. We started off talking about AWS Compute, moved on to storage and database solutions, very quickly walked through the networking tools available on AWS, and did a lightning fast overview of various management and analytics tools. Now you should have a pretty good idea of the various services AWS offers for typical web application use cases. However, before we sign off, I wanted to go over a few of the more niche services that AWS has. There are many of these, and I'll only touch on a few, but just goes to show how much AWS has to offer no matter what your use case.

The first is AWS Lambda. If you'll remember, I actually mentioned this briefly in the AWS Compute lecture in relation to something called serverless architecture. AWS Lambda is a service that let's you upload chunks of code to Amazon, and just run them without worrying about what kind of infrastructure they're run on. You only pay for the code when it runs, meaning that this can be really useful for processes that happen infrequently. Lambda code can easily interact with other parts of AWS, making automating management over your AWS resources a breeze. It's also neat for use with Internet of Things devices, as the processes only need to run when the devices ping your Lambda code base, and otherwise can sit idle without costing you money or resources.

Speaking of the Internet of Things, AWS offers an IoT platform that lets you easily connect devices to the cloud, whether you're passively monitoring data or directly interacting with your users. The IoT service works together with Lambda, S3 and other services to make building IoT apps much easier.

A frequent application of IoT devices is to capture a lot of data for the creation of artificial intelligence systems, and Amazon offers the services for that as well. In particular, the Machine Learning service lets you create systems that will train themselves on the data you provide to get smarter at making decisions over time. Combining the AWS, Lambda, IoT and Machine Learning services is like something out of a science fiction movie that lets you build self-improving intelligent machines. Just be careful they don't take over.

Finally, on a more lighthearted note, AWS's Lumberyard is a full-fledged game engine. With it, you can create 3D multiplayer games for PC, mobile, console or even virtual reality systems. Lumberyard integrates well with Twitch so that your users can stream their games for others to watch, a really large business, believe it or not. Lumberyard is free and opensource, but connects with other AWS services, which you'll have to pay for. If you've ever wanted to create a 3D game or any 3D software, this is a great way to do it.

And that's that. Now you have a well-rounded understanding of the AWS ecosystem. With hundreds of services, AWS is a robust way to handle cloud computation, storage, hosting, development and even artificial intelligence. If you'd like to learn more about how to do these things, keep following along with more CloudAcademy courses. I'd specifically recommend the Fundamentals of AWS learning path to dive deep into how to actually use these services.

So thanks so much for taking this course with me. I hope it's been useful. I'd love to hear any comments or feedbacks you have, whether it's something you enjoyed about the course, or constructive criticism on how to improve it. So please leave that feedback on the comments section of the course landing page. Thanks and happy learning.

About the Author

Students3691
Courses3

Adrian M Ryan is an educator and product manager. He was an early employee at General Assembly, has co-founded an education startup and a consultancy, and he loves teaching. He grew up in rural Alaska, and while he now lives in New York City he makes sure to find time to get out in the woods hiking whenever possible.