Skip to main content

New Whitepaper: Separating Multi-Cloud Strategy from Hype

A 2017 RightScale survey* reported that 85% of enterprises have embraced a multi-cloud strategy. However, depending on whom you ask, multi-cloud is either an essential enterprise strategy or a nonsense buzzword.

Part of the reason for such opposing views is that we lack a complete definition of multi-cloud.
What is multi-cloud? There is little controversy in stating that multi-cloud is “the simultaneous use of multiple cloud vendors,” but to what end, exactly? Many articles superficially claim that multi-cloud is a strategy for avoiding vendor lock-in, for implementing high availability, for allowing teams to deploy the best platform for their app, and the list goes on.

But where can teams really derive the most benefit from a multi-cloud strategy? Without any substance to these claims, it can be difficult to determine if multi-cloud can live past its 15 minutes of fame.

Is multi-cloud a strategy for avoiding vendor lock-in?

Of the many benefits associated with multi-cloud, avoiding vendor lock-in is probably the most cited reason for a multi-cloud strategy. In a recent Stratoscale survey, more than 80% of enterprises reported moderate to high levels of concern about being locked into a single public cloud platform.

more than 80% of enterprises reported moderate to high levels of concern about being locked in to a single public cloud platform.

How you see vendor lock-in depends on your organization’s goals. For some companies, avoiding vendor lock-in is a core business requirement or a way to achieve greater portability for their applications. With such portability, teams can more easily move applications to another framework or platform. For others, being able to take advantage of vendor-specific features that save time on initial development is an acceptable trade-off for portability. Regardless of your point of view, a strategy that avoids vendor lock-in at all costs does mean that you will have to give up some unique vendor functionality.

In most cases, teams can still avoid vendor lock-in even without using multiple cloud providers. But how?
The key to staying flexible even within a single platform is about the choices you make. Building in degrees of tolerance and applying disciplined design decisions as a matter of strategy can ensure flexibility and portability down the road.

With this in mind, teams can work to abstract away vendor-specific functionality. Here are two simple examples:

  • Code level: Accessing functionality such as blob storage through an interface that could be implemented using any storage back-end (local storage, S3, Azure Storage, Google Cloud Storage, among other options). In addition to the flexibility this provides during testing, this tactic makes it easier for developers to port to a new platform if needed.
  • Containers: Containers and their orchestration tools are additional abstraction layers that can make workloads more flexible and portable.

Any technology decision represents some degree of lock-in, so organizations must weigh the pros and cons of depending too heavily on any single platform or tools.

So, is multi-cloud a really an effective strategy for avoiding vendor lock-in?

The bottom line is this: A multi-cloud strategy can help you avoid vendor lock-in, but it isn’t a requirement.
Implementing high availability and pursuing a best-fit technology approach are also frequently cited as a benefit of a multi-cloud strategy. But how do these hold up when it comes to real deployments and actual business cases?
This is just one of the questions that we’ll answer in our new whitepaper, Separating Multi-Cloud Strategy from Hype: An Objective Analysis of Arguments in Favor of Multi-Cloud.
You will learn:

  • The reality vs. hype of multi-cloud deployments
  • How to achieve high availability while avoiding vendor lock-in
  • The advantages of a best-fit technology approach
  • The arguments that should be driving your multi-cloud strategy

Discover the best approach for your multi-cloud strategy in our new whitepaper, download now.
Discover the best approach for your multi-cloud strategy in our new whitepaper.
References: RightScale 2017 State of the Cloud Report | 2017 Stratoscale Hybrid Cloud Survey

 

Avatar

Written by

Cloud Academy Team

Related Posts

Jeff Hyatt
Jeff Hyatt
— June 18, 2019

10 Steps for an Effective Reserved Instances Strategy

Amazon Web Services (AWS) offers three different ways to pay for EC2 Instances: On-Demand, Reserved Instances, and Spot Instances. This article will focus on effective strategies for purchasing Reserved Instances. While most of the major cloud platforms offer pre-pay and reservation dis...

Read more
  • AWS
  • EC2
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— June 18, 2019

AWS Certification Practice Exam: What to Expect from Test Questions

If you’re building applications on the AWS cloud or looking to get started in cloud computing, certification is a way to build deep knowledge in key services unique to the AWS platform. AWS currently offers 11 certifications that cover major cloud roles including Solutions Architect, De...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS Certifications
Avatar
John Chell
— June 13, 2019

AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate: A Study Guide

The AWS Solutions Architect - Associate Certification (or Sol Arch Associate for short) offers some clear benefits: Increases marketability to employers Provides solid credentials in a growing industry (with projected growth of as much as 70 percent in five years) Market anal...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS Certifications
Chris Gambino and Joe Niemiec
Chris Gambino and Joe Niemiec
— June 11, 2019

Moving Data to S3 with Apache NiFi

Moving data to the cloud is one of the cornerstones of any cloud migration. Apache NiFi is an open source tool that enables you to easily move and process data using a graphical user interface (GUI).  In this blog post, we will examine a simple way to move data to the cloud using NiFi c...

Read more
  • AWS
  • S3
Avatar
Chandan Patra
— June 11, 2019

Amazon DynamoDB: 10 Things You Should Know

Amazon DynamoDB is a managed NoSQL service with strong consistency and predictable performance that shields users from the complexities of manual setup.Whether or not you've actually used a NoSQL data store yourself, it's probably a good idea to make sure you fully understand the key ...

Read more
  • AWS
  • DynamoDB
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— June 6, 2019

The 11 AWS Certifications: Which is Right for You and Your Team?

As companies increasingly shift workloads to the public cloud, cloud computing has moved from a nice-to-have to a core competency in the enterprise. This shift requires a new set of skills to design, deploy, and manage applications in cloud computing.As the market leader and most ma...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS Certifications
Sam Ghardashem
Sam Ghardashem
— May 15, 2019

Aviatrix Integration of a NextGen Firewall in AWS Transit Gateway

Learn how Aviatrix’s intelligent orchestration and control eliminates unwanted tradeoffs encountered when deploying Palo Alto Networks VM-Series Firewalls with AWS Transit Gateway.Deploying any next generation firewall in a public cloud environment is challenging, not because of the f...

Read more
  • AWS
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— May 3, 2019

AWS Config Best Practices for Compliance

Use AWS Config the Right Way for Successful ComplianceIt’s well-known that AWS Config is a powerful service for monitoring all changes across your resources. As AWS Config has constantly evolved and improved over the years, it has transformed into a true powerhouse for monitoring your...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Compliance
Avatar
Francesca Vigliani
— April 30, 2019

Cloud Academy is Coming to the AWS Summits in Atlanta, London, and Chicago

Cloud Academy is a proud sponsor of the 2019 AWS Summits in Atlanta, London, and Chicago. We hope you plan to attend these free events that bring the cloud computing community together to connect, collaborate, and learn about AWS. These events are all about learning. You can learn how t...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS Summits
Paul Hortop
Paul Hortop
— April 2, 2019

How to Monitor Your AWS Infrastructure

The AWS cloud platform has made it easier than ever to be flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. However, monitoring your AWS infrastructure is the key to getting all of these benefits. Realizing these benefits requires that you follow AWS best practices which constantly change as AWS...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Monitoring
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— April 1, 2019

AWS EC2 Instance Types Explained

Amazon Web Services’ resource offerings are constantly changing, and staying on top of their evolution can be a challenge. Elastic Cloud Compute (EC2) instances are one of their core resource offerings, and they form the backbone of most cloud deployments. EC2 instances provide you with...

Read more
  • AWS
  • EC2
Avatar
Nitheesh Poojary
— March 26, 2019

How DNS Works – the Domain Name System (Part One)

Before migrating domains to Amazon's Route53, we should first make sure we properly understand how DNS worksWhile we'll get to AWS's Route53 Domain Name System (DNS) service in the second part of this series, I thought it would be helpful to first make sure that we properly understand...

Read more
  • AWS