AWS Marketplace: Harness the Value of Free Amazon Machine Images

You can usually find something that will work well for you on the AWS Marketplace… for free!

An Amazon Machine Image (AMI) is a template that contains the software stack (operating system, application server, and applications) required to launch your instance. You can select an AMI supported directly by AWS, an AMI you built yourself, or one you choose from the AWS Marketplace.

The AWS marketplace can actually be a terrific source of AMIs. If your project isn’t too far off the beaten path, you can usually find one that will work for you right out of the box…and often for free. I’m going to show you the kinds of packages that are available, and how you go about finding and installing free stuff from the Marketplace.

Find free stuff on AWS Marketplace

If you don’t already know how to find AWS Marketplace AMIs, it is very simple. Just open your AWS console, click on the EC2 service icon, click on “Launch Instance” and then in the left-hand column select “AWS Marketplace”. You should now be greeted with…

Find and buy software that runs in the AWS Cloud, software from trusted vendors like SAP, Zend, Microsoft, as well as many open source offerings. You can now find and launch software directly within EC2 for all AWS Marketplace AMI products. View Marketplace products you are currently subscribed to by visiting Your Software in the AWS Marketplace.

Currently, I see that there are 1,082 Software Infrastructure products, 115 Developer Tool products, and 547 Business Software products listed.

Let’s try something out. Because it’s my personal favorite I will search for WordPress. “WordPress” returns 58 products. Browsing down the list, you will see some products described as $0.00/hr for software + AWS usage fees, while others go for rates like $0.03/hr for software + AWS usage fees.

Obviously, $0.00/hr means “this software is free.” Since this article is about free stuff, we’ll take one of those.

I also suggest that you choose HVM. Amazon Machine Images use one of two types of virtualization: paravirtual (PV) or hardware virtual machine (HVM). The main difference between PV and HVM is the way in which they boot and whether they can take advantage of special hardware extensions (CPU, network, and storage) for better performance. AWS recommends that, for the best performance, you use current-generation instance types and HVM AMIs when you launch new instances. I am also going to choose the one supplied by Bitnami as I have used them before and they seem solid. And who could say no to Ubuntu?

So here’s what we selected:

  • WordPress powered by Bitnami (HVM)
  • 4.2.2-0 on Ubuntu 14.04.1 
  • $0.00/hr for software + AWS usage fees
  • Linux/Unix, Ubuntu 14.04.1 | 64-bit Amazon Machine Image (AMI) | Updated: 5/12/15

Working with your new AMI

Next, hit the Select button on the right and then choose some appropriate variation of these settings:

  1. Choose AMI – We have already chosen our AMI.
  2. Choose Instance Type – t2.micro
  3. Configure Instance – choose defaults
  4. Add Storage – 10 GB
  5. Tag Instance – Key is Name and Value is WordPress Bitnami (HVM)
  6. Configure a Security Group – Use the group they pick but change the source of your SSH connection to MY IP
  7. Review and Launch
  8. Choose a key pair or create a new one
  9. Launch

If all goes well you should eventually see the following:

Your instances are now launching

And then:

The following instance launches have been initiated: i-xxxxxxx View launch log

If you now go to your EC2 Dashboard you should see a new instance running. Look for your Public DNS among your instance details. Now all you need to do is cut/paste the Public DNS into your favorite browser and, voilà, you should hopefully something similar to this:
AWS Marketplace test

Wow! That was easy but where’s my admin password?

Glad you asked. For a bitnami Wordpress installation, the the Username is user.

To get your Password you need to check the ‘Get system log’ of your instance under Instance Settings. Scroll down to near the bottom and you should see something like the screenshot below.
AWS Marketplace - Get System Log
In my case, the password is 79fCKADfCixI – which will be deleted by the time anyone reads this article!

One more thing. If you intend to make this a real production website, I suggest that you consider purchasing a reserved instance. I was a little confused when I purchased my first reserved instance, as you don’t actually tie the reserved instance to the one you have just launched. But it’s much simpler than I thought. Just follow the steps below and your reserved instance should magically tie itself to the AMI you have launched.

  1. Choose the same instance type.
  2. Make sure you are in the same region when you choose it.
  3. Choose the same Availability Zone

 

Avatar

Written by

Michael Sheehy

I have been UNIX/Linux System Administrator for the past 15 years and am slowly moving those skills into the AWS Cloud arena. I am passionate about AWS and Cloud Technologies and the exciting future that it promises to bring.

Related Posts

Avatar
Michael Sheehy
— August 19, 2019

What Exactly Is a Cloud Architect and How Do You Become One?

One of the buzzwords surrounding the cloud that I'm sure you've heard is "Cloud Architect." In this article, I will outline my understanding of what a cloud architect does and I'll analyze the skills and certifications necessary to become one. I will also list some of the types of jobs ...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Cloud Computing
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— August 13, 2019

Content Roadmap: AZ-500, ITIL 4, MS-100, Google Cloud Associate Engineer, and More

Last month, Cloud Academy joined forces with QA, the UK’s largest B2B skills provider, and it put us in an excellent position to solve a massive skills gap problem. As a result of this collaboration, you will see our training library grow with additions from QA’s massive catalog of 500+...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • content roadmap
  • Google Cloud Platform
Avatar
Adam Hawkins
— August 9, 2019

DevSecOps: How to Secure DevOps Environments

Security has been a friction point when discussing DevOps. This stems from the assumption that DevOps teams move too fast to handle security concerns. This makes sense if Information Security (InfoSec) is separate from the DevOps value stream, or if development velocity exceeds the band...

Read more
  • AWS
  • cloud security
  • DevOps
  • DevSecOps
  • Security
Avatar
Stefano Giacone
— August 8, 2019

Test Your Cloud Knowledge on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud Platform

Cloud skills are in demand | In today's digital era, employers are constantly seeking skilled professionals with working knowledge of AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. According to the 2019 Trends in Cloud Transformation report by 451 Research: Business and IT transformations re...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Cloud skills
  • Google Cloud
  • Microsoft Azure
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— August 7, 2019

Disadvantages of Cloud Computing

If you want to deliver digital services of any kind, you’ll need to estimate all types of resources, not the least of which are CPU, memory, storage, and network connectivity. Which resources you choose for your delivery —  cloud-based or local — is up to you. But you’ll definitely want...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • Cloud Computing
  • Google Cloud Platform
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— August 6, 2019

Google Cloud vs AWS: A Comparison (or can they be compared?)

The "Google Cloud vs AWS" argument used to be a common discussion among our members, but is this still really a thing? You may already know that there are three major players in the public cloud platforms arena: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP)...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Google Cloud Platform
  • Kubernetes
Avatar
Stuart Scott
— July 29, 2019

Deployment Orchestration with AWS Elastic Beanstalk

If you're responsible for the development and deployment of web applications within your AWS environment for your organization, then it's likely you've heard of AWS Elastic Beanstalk. If you are new to this service, or simply need to know a bit more about the service and the benefits th...

Read more
  • AWS
  • elastic beanstalk
Avatar
Stuart Scott
— July 26, 2019

How to Use & Install the AWS CLI

What is the AWS CLI? | The AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) is for managing your AWS services from a terminal session on your own client, allowing you to control and configure multiple AWS services and implement a level of automation. If you’ve been using AWS for some time and feel...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS CLI
  • Command line interface
Alisha Reyes
Alisha Reyes
— July 22, 2019

Cloud Academy’s Blog Digest: July 2019

July has been a very exciting month for us at Cloud Academy. On July 10, we officially joined forces with QA, the UK’s largest B2B skills provider (read the announcement). Over the coming weeks, you will see additions from QA’s massive catalog of 500+ certification courses and 1500+ ins...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • Cloud Academy
  • Cybersecurity
  • DevOps
  • Kubernetes
Avatar
Stuart Scott
— July 18, 2019

AWS Fundamentals: Understanding Compute, Storage, Database, Networking & Security

If you are just starting out on your journey toward mastering AWS cloud computing, then your first stop should be to understand the AWS fundamentals. This will enable you to get a solid foundation to then expand your knowledge across the entire AWS service catalog.   It can be both d...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Compute
  • Database
  • fundamentals
  • networking
  • Security
  • Storage
Avatar
Adam Hawkins
— July 17, 2019

How to Become a DevOps Engineer

The DevOps Handbook introduces DevOps as a framework for improving the process for converting a business hypothesis into a technology-enabled service that delivers value to the customer. This process is called the value stream. Accelerate finds that applying DevOps principles of flow, f...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS Certifications
  • DevOps
  • DevOps Foundation Certification
  • Engineer
  • Kubernetes
Avatar
Vineet Badola
— July 15, 2019

AWS AMI Virtualization Types: HVM vs PV (Paravirtual VS Hardware VM)

Amazon Machine Images (AWS AMI) offers two types of virtualization: Paravirtual (PV) and Hardware Virtual Machine (HVM). Each solution offers its own advantages. When we’re using AWS, it’s easy for someone — almost without thinking —  to choose which AMI flavor seems best when spinning...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Hardware Virtual Machine
  • Paravirtual
  • Virtualization