AWS re:Invent Day 2. New Security service announced: Amazon GuardDuty

As ever, cloud security is the number-one priority for AWS. During the Tuesday Night Live event, just hours before Andy Jassy’s keynote, AWS announced the launch of Amazon GuardDuty, now the 10th service in the AWS Security, Identity & Compliance category.

What is Amazon GuardDuty?

Amazon GuardDuty is an intelligent threat detection service. It allows users to monitor their AWS account for unusual and unexpected behavior and to analyze and monitor existing logs, such as CloudTrail Event Logs, VPC Flow Logs, and DNS Logs. It assesses data from multiple feeds with a focus on threat detection by looking for anomalies and known malicious sources such as IP addresses and URLs.

The service itself is powered by Machine Learning, which allows it to continuously evolve and understand your infrastructure. Amazon GuardDuty looks at erroneous patterns with your AWS account that could indicate potential threats to your environment. These threats could be behavioral based, where a resource has been compromised by account or credential exposure, unexpected API calls that sit outside security best practices, or even communications from suspicious sources.
Using the threat detection feeds, which can be generated from public sources or provided from within AWS itself, this service provides automatic and continuous security analysis for safeguarding your entire AWS environment.

Getting Started

GuardDuty analyzes a number of your logs within your account. To activate this service, the following service role permissions are automatically generated:
{
 “Version”: “2012-10-17”,
 “Statement”: [
   {
     “Effect”: “Allow”,
     “Action”: [
       “ec2:DescribeInstances”,
       “ec2:DescribeImages”
     ],
     “Resource”: “*”
   }
 ]
}
The service can then assume this role using the following Trust Relationship, which is also created during activation:
{
 “Version”: “2012-10-17”,
 “Statement”: [
   {
     “Effect”: “Allow”,
     “Principal”: {
       “Service”: “guardduty.amazonaws.com”
     },
     “Action”: [
       “sts:AssumeRole”
     ]
   }
 ]
}
The service itself is very easy to enable within your account. Simply click “Enable GuardDuty” within the service dashboard in the AWS management console:
Welcome to GuardDuty
Once enabled, the service will begin analysis right away. Any findings will be displayed on the dashboard. By categorizing each as low, medium, or high, you can immediately focus on the findings that could be the source of a severe security threat. The detail contained in each finding allows you to dig deeper into the potential issue. This may include Region, resource ID, principal ID, API, the threat list name, or port, for example.

Pricing

A security service that can seemingly detect and analyze huge amounts of data while learning both safe and malicious activity patterns within your infrastructure… You’re probably thinking, how much is this going to cost me?

Thankfully, AWS has provided a free trial for the service upon first activation. You’ll have 30 days and full access to the service to see if it’s a good fit for your security strategy and processes. To estimate the costs going forward, Amazon GuardDuty will generate an estimate of how much you would have spent outside your free trial.

Amazon GuardDuty pricing is based on the quantity of analysis of your AWS log data. Your VPC Flow Logs and DNS Logs will be charged per GB, per month of analysis. Your CloudTrail Event Logs are charged per 1,000,000 events, per month. For monthly information on specific charges per region, see the AWS Pricing page.

Bottom line: Amazon GuardDuty uses machine learning to optimize and analyze potential security threats within your AWS environment without impacting the performance of ANY of your existing services and workloads. In essence, this looks to be a great addition to the security and compliance service category.

I’ll be at re:Invent all week, attending sessions and working at the Venetian Expo Hall, booth 1702. Come by and say hello, or follow me on Twitter @Stuart_A_Scott for further updates.

Avatar

Written by

Stuart Scott

Stuart is the AWS content lead at Cloud Academy where he has created over 40 courses reaching tens of thousands of students. His content focuses heavily on cloud security and compliance, specifically on how to implement and configure AWS services to protect, monitor and secure customer data and their AWS environment.

Related Posts

Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— September 12, 2019

Real-Time Application Monitoring with Amazon Kinesis

Amazon Kinesis is a real-time data streaming service that makes it easy to collect, process, and analyze data so you can get quick insights and react as fast as possible to new information.  With Amazon Kinesis you can ingest real-time data such as application logs, website clickstre...

Read more
  • amazon kinesis
  • AWS
  • Stream Analytics
  • Streaming data
Avatar
Alex Casalboni
— September 3, 2019

Google Vision vs. Amazon Rekognition: A Vendor-Neutral Comparison

Google Cloud Vision and Amazon Rekognition offer a broad spectrum of solutions, some of which are comparable in terms of functional details, quality, performance, and costs. This post is a fact-based comparative analysis on Google Vision vs. Amazon Rekognition and will focus on the tech...

Read more
  • Amazon Rekognition
  • AWS
  • Google Cloud Platform
  • Google Vision
Alisha Reyes
Alisha Reyes
— August 30, 2019

New on Cloud Academy: CISSP, AWS, Azure, & DevOps Labs, Python for Beginners, and more…

As Hurricane Dorian intensifies, it looks like Floridians across the entire state might have to hunker down for another big one. If you've gone through a hurricane, you know that preparing for one is no joke. You'll need a survival kit with plenty of water, flashlights, batteries, and n...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • Google Cloud Platform
  • New content
  • Product Feature
  • Python programming
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— August 27, 2019

Amazon Route 53: Why You Should Consider DNS Migration

What Amazon Route 53 brings to the DNS table Amazon Route 53 is a highly available and scalable Domain Name System (DNS) service offered by AWS. It is named by the TCP or UDP port 53, which is where DNS server requests are addressed. Like any DNS service, Route 53 handles domain regist...

Read more
  • Amazon
  • AWS
  • Cloud Migration
  • DNS
  • Route 53
Alisha Reyes
Alisha Reyes
— August 22, 2019

How to Unlock Complimentary Access to Cloud Academy

Are you looking to get trained or certified on AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform, DevOps, Cloud Security, Python, Java, or another technical skill? Then you'll want to mark your calendars for August 23, 2019. Starting Friday at 12:00 a.m. PDT (3:00 a.m. EDT), Cloud Academy is offering c...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • cloud academy content
  • complimentary access
  • GCP
  • on the house
Avatar
Michael Sheehy
— August 19, 2019

What Exactly Is a Cloud Architect and How Do You Become One?

One of the buzzwords surrounding the cloud that I'm sure you've heard is "Cloud Architect." In this article, I will outline my understanding of what a cloud architect does and I'll analyze the skills and certifications necessary to become one. I will also list some of the types of jobs ...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Cloud Computing
Avatar
Nitheesh Poojary
— August 19, 2019

Boto: Using Python to Automate AWS Services

Boto allows you to write scripts to automate things like starting AWS EC2 instances Boto is a Python package that provides programmatic connectivity to Amazon Web Services (AWS). AWS offers a range of services for dynamically scaling servers including the core compute service, Elastic...

Read more
  • Automated AWS Services
  • AWS
  • Boto
  • Python
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— August 13, 2019

Content Roadmap: AZ-500, ITIL 4, MS-100, Google Cloud Associate Engineer, and More

Last month, Cloud Academy joined forces with QA, the UK’s largest B2B skills provider, and it put us in an excellent position to solve a massive skills gap problem. As a result of this collaboration, you will see our training library grow with additions from QA’s massive catalog of 500+...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • content roadmap
  • Google Cloud Platform
Avatar
Adam Hawkins
— August 9, 2019

DevSecOps: How to Secure DevOps Environments

Security has been a friction point when discussing DevOps. This stems from the assumption that DevOps teams move too fast to handle security concerns. This makes sense if Information Security (InfoSec) is separate from the DevOps value stream, or if development velocity exceeds the band...

Read more
  • AWS
  • cloud security
  • DevOps
  • DevSecOps
  • Security
Avatar
Stefano Giacone
— August 8, 2019

Test Your Cloud Knowledge on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud Platform

Cloud skills are in demand | In today's digital era, employers are constantly seeking skilled professionals with working knowledge of AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. According to the 2019 Trends in Cloud Transformation report by 451 Research: Business and IT transformations re...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Cloud skills
  • Google Cloud
  • Microsoft Azure
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— August 7, 2019

Disadvantages of Cloud Computing

If you want to deliver digital services of any kind, you’ll need to estimate all types of resources, not the least of which are CPU, memory, storage, and network connectivity. Which resources you choose for your delivery —  cloud-based or local — is up to you. But you’ll definitely want...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • Cloud Computing
  • Google Cloud Platform
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— August 6, 2019

Google Cloud vs AWS: A Comparison (or can they be compared?)

The "Google Cloud vs AWS" argument used to be a common discussion among our members, but is this still really a thing? You may already know that there are three major players in the public cloud platforms arena: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP)...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Google Cloud Platform
  • Kubernetes