Linux Certification courses: prepare for the LPIC-1 exams

Linux administration skills are worth gold these days. And the kind of skills that come with Linux certifications are even better.

A new Linux certification training series

As you might already have noticed, Cloud Academy has been busy producing a series of courses on Linux certification in server administration. While these eleven courses are immensely valuable in and of themselves, they are specifically designed to mirror the material you would need to pass the widely respected Linux Professional Institute’s LPIC-1 Server Professional exams. The LPIC level one certification requires candidates to pass two exams: the 101 and the 102.
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We’ve just published the fifth of these courses, and with that, all the material you’ll need for the first exam is now online. That should be plenty to keep you out of trouble while the remaining courses – covering exam 102 – come online over the next weeks.
But this is Cloud Academy: what’s cloudy about Linux?
These courses will, naturally, focus primarily on Linux. But where Linux and the cloud overlap, we’ll make a point of it. And since so much of the infrastructure driving the cloud is built on Linux systems, the two are never really all that far apart. Think about it: most Internet giants – including Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Amazon – rely pretty much exclusively on Linux to run their services. Somewhere close to three-quarters of all instances launched on AWS are booting into a Linux distribution of one sort or another. And let’s not forget that the most widely used mobile OS, Android, is based on the Linux kernel.
Someone’s going to have to keep all this running. Why not you?
As we like to put it: the cloud is the future, and Linux skills are the tools you’ll need to get there.

Written by

A Linux system administrator with twenty years' experience as a high school teacher, David has been around the industry long enough to have witnessed decades of technology trend predictions; most of them turning out to be dead wrong.

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