What is Serverless Computing? A new Learning Path from Cloud Academy

Serverless computing has been referred to as the natural next step in the transition to infrastructure as a service (IaaS). With major companies like Coca-Cola and Major League Baseball going serverless, it’s getting a lot of traction for its ability to help companies achieve new levels of speed and scale in building applications. Think of Cloud Academy new Learning Path as your guide to serverless—what is Serverless Computing, how it works, and how you can use it. 

What is serverless?

While cloud computing has made it possible for us to manage virtual computers and services, it still requires users to be proficient with provisioning and managing compute resources. Serverless computing makes cloud computing even easier.

With serverless, it’s not as if there are no servers, as the term implies. The point is, you no longer have to manage them (your cloud provider does that for you). Serverless computing takes developers further away from infrastructure so they can focus almost exclusively on building code for single functions (which is why it is probably better described as Functions as a Service).

As instructor Andrew Larkin describes it, “Serverless computing is a bit like a car share service. You just want a vehicle to get you to your destination, whether that is just across town or across the country. It is expected that you will drive carefully when using the vehicle, and you will report any damage. However, you are not expected to pay for the car to be built before you use it, and you are not expected to contribute to the cost of buying or preparing the vehicle. You only pay for the time that you use the service.

What is Serverless Computing?

Why should I learn about serverless computing now?

Serverless is being recognized for its ability to help companies reduce complexity and move faster when it comes to creating new applications and bringing them to market.

While cloud computing has made it possible for us to manage virtual computers and services, customers still need to be proficient with provisioning and managing compute resources. With the release of AWS Lambda in 2014 (the first serverless platform), Amazon Web Services went a step further in making cloud computing easier and more accessible by managing the underlying compute layer for us. Today, the other major cloud providers also have serverless platforms, including Google Cloud Functions and Microsoft Azure Functions. If you’re interested in understanding the difference between Microsoft Azure Functions, Google Cloud Functions and AWS Lambda we recommend to take a look at our article Fight for serverless cloud domination continues.

There are many advantages of developing applications where we don’t need to manage the server you deploy the application on. You don’t have to manage the server at all. With serverless computing, the cloud service provider manages the computing environment for you. You pay for the time that your function is executing, rather than the time a machine is provisioned for. When we need to scale a function up or down, you just scale that single function. You don’t need to scale an entire system, a container, or an application. Another real benefit is that serverless has built-in fault tolerance and high availability by design.

Serverless is going to keep costs down by charging you only for the execution time of your workloads, not for idle resources. You’re not paying for service, only for invocations of your functions, which is a positive model when you’re talking to businesses about transaction times and for them to determine the actual cost of delivery of a function.

Whether you’re a developer or a CTO, you’ll want to know more about serverless computing.

What is Serverless Computing? What you will learn

In the new Cloud Academy Getting started with Serverless Computing Learning Path, we’re going to look at how serverless works. We will look at some of the building blocks that are common to serverless computing, and how it differs from traditional computing. We will discuss some common use cases for serverless computing can be used, and we’ll look at some of the ways that we can start to use it.
This learning path contains video courses as well as hands-on labs. We will build our first REST API using the AWS API gateway service, and we will create our first serverless function using the AWS Lambda service.

Sign up to take full advantage of the entire suite of courses and get started with Serverless today!

Avatar

Written by

Cloud Academy Team

Related Posts

Avatar
Michael Sheehy
— August 19, 2019

What Exactly Is a Cloud Architect and How Do You Become One?

One of the buzzwords surrounding the cloud that I'm sure you've heard is "Cloud Architect." In this article, I will outline my understanding of what a cloud architect does and I'll analyze the skills and certifications necessary to become one. I will also list some of the types of jobs ...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Cloud Computing
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— August 13, 2019

Content Roadmap: AZ-500, ITIL 4, MS-100, Google Cloud Associate Engineer, and More

Last month, Cloud Academy joined forces with QA, the UK’s largest B2B skills provider, and it put us in an excellent position to solve a massive skills gap problem. As a result of this collaboration, you will see our training library grow with additions from QA’s massive catalog of 500+...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • content roadmap
  • Google Cloud Platform
Avatar
Adam Hawkins
— August 9, 2019

DevSecOps: How to Secure DevOps Environments

Security has been a friction point when discussing DevOps. This stems from the assumption that DevOps teams move too fast to handle security concerns. This makes sense if Information Security (InfoSec) is separate from the DevOps value stream, or if development velocity exceeds the band...

Read more
  • AWS
  • cloud security
  • DevOps
  • DevSecOps
  • Security
Avatar
Stefano Giacone
— August 8, 2019

Test Your Cloud Knowledge on AWS, Azure, or Google Cloud Platform

Cloud skills are in demand | In today's digital era, employers are constantly seeking skilled professionals with working knowledge of AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. According to the 2019 Trends in Cloud Transformation report by 451 Research: Business and IT transformations re...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Cloud skills
  • Google Cloud
  • Microsoft Azure
Avatar
Andrew Larkin
— August 7, 2019

Disadvantages of Cloud Computing

If you want to deliver digital services of any kind, you’ll need to estimate all types of resources, not the least of which are CPU, memory, storage, and network connectivity. Which resources you choose for your delivery —  cloud-based or local — is up to you. But you’ll definitely want...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • Cloud Computing
  • Google Cloud Platform
Joe Nemer
Joe Nemer
— August 6, 2019

Google Cloud vs AWS: A Comparison (or can they be compared?)

The "Google Cloud vs AWS" argument used to be a common discussion among our members, but is this still really a thing? You may already know that there are three major players in the public cloud platforms arena: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform (GCP)...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Google Cloud Platform
  • Kubernetes
Avatar
Stuart Scott
— July 29, 2019

Deployment Orchestration with AWS Elastic Beanstalk

If you're responsible for the development and deployment of web applications within your AWS environment for your organization, then it's likely you've heard of AWS Elastic Beanstalk. If you are new to this service, or simply need to know a bit more about the service and the benefits th...

Read more
  • AWS
  • elastic beanstalk
Avatar
Stuart Scott
— July 26, 2019

How to Use & Install the AWS CLI

What is the AWS CLI? | The AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) is for managing your AWS services from a terminal session on your own client, allowing you to control and configure multiple AWS services and implement a level of automation. If you’ve been using AWS for some time and feel...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS CLI
  • Command line interface
Alisha Reyes
Alisha Reyes
— July 22, 2019

Cloud Academy’s Blog Digest: July 2019

July has been a very exciting month for us at Cloud Academy. On July 10, we officially joined forces with QA, the UK’s largest B2B skills provider (read the announcement). Over the coming weeks, you will see additions from QA’s massive catalog of 500+ certification courses and 1500+ ins...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Azure
  • Cloud Academy
  • Cybersecurity
  • DevOps
  • Kubernetes
Avatar
Stuart Scott
— July 18, 2019

AWS Fundamentals: Understanding Compute, Storage, Database, Networking & Security

If you are just starting out on your journey toward mastering AWS cloud computing, then your first stop should be to understand the AWS fundamentals. This will enable you to get a solid foundation to then expand your knowledge across the entire AWS service catalog.   It can be both d...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Compute
  • Database
  • fundamentals
  • networking
  • Security
  • Storage
Avatar
Adam Hawkins
— July 17, 2019

How to Become a DevOps Engineer

The DevOps Handbook introduces DevOps as a framework for improving the process for converting a business hypothesis into a technology-enabled service that delivers value to the customer. This process is called the value stream. Accelerate finds that applying DevOps principles of flow, f...

Read more
  • AWS
  • AWS Certifications
  • DevOps
  • DevOps Foundation Certification
  • Engineer
  • Kubernetes
Avatar
Vineet Badola
— July 15, 2019

AWS AMI Virtualization Types: HVM vs PV (Paravirtual VS Hardware VM)

Amazon Machine Images (AWS AMI) offers two types of virtualization: Paravirtual (PV) and Hardware Virtual Machine (HVM). Each solution offers its own advantages. When we’re using AWS, it’s easy for someone — almost without thinking —  to choose which AMI flavor seems best when spinning...

Read more
  • AWS
  • Hardware Virtual Machine
  • Paravirtual
  • Virtualization